Eddie Aikau: Who was the daring surfer and what occured to him?

Eddie Aikau: Who was the daring surfer and what occured to him?

The fearless life of Eddie Aikau is being recollected with a Google Doodle on what might have been his 73rd birthday.

Aikau, a lifeguard and surfing champion, was conceived on the island of Maui on 4 May 1946, preceding moving with his family to Oahu in 1959.

In Oahu, Aikau demonstrated he was similarly as agreeable in the water as he was on land, as the main lifeguard employed by Honolulu authorities to work on the North Shore.

Amid his years securing Waimea Bay, Aikau figured out how to securely safeguard in excess of 500 individuals without the help of a jet ski or other modern equipment, as indicated by the Google Doodle.

In 1971, Aikau’s dedication and persistence to rescuing individuals, even notwithstanding surf that achieved 30 feet high, was compensated with the respect Lifeguard of the Year.

Aside from his aptitudes as a lifeguard, Aikau was likewise a practiced surfer, who, in 1977, wound up one of the first native Hawaiians to win the Duke Kahanamoku Invitational Surfing Championship – four years after his more seasoned sibling won.

Only a year later, at 31 years old, Aikau would lose his life while volunteering as an individual from the Polynesian Voyaging Society, which was following the antiquated 2,500 route of the Polynesian relocation in a truly precise double-hulled canoe.

While making the 30-day trip, the volunteers built up a break and upset miles from Molokai island – inciting Aikau to take his surfboard and swim for help.

The remainder of the team was saved by the US Coast Guard however Aikau was gone forever.

Aikau’s valiance and name live on through the Eddie Aikau Foundation, and The Eddie Quiksilver Big Wave Invitational, a surfing rivalry supported by Quiksilver that requires the precondition of sea swells of at least 20 feet.

The competition to pay tribute to the Hawaii local was most-as of late held in February 2016, and won by John Florence.

Aikau was likewise recalled in the trademark “Eddie Would Go”, which appeared on bumper stickers and T-shirts in Hawaii.

The Google Doodle was made in partnership with the Eddie Aikau Foundation, which said: “A legendary surfer and lifeguard for the city and county county of Honolulu, Eddie Aikau was one of the greatest big wave riders in the world.

“As the first lifeguard ever stationed at Waimea Bay on the North Shore of Oahu, Eddie is credited with saving the lives of hundreds of swimmers and surfers, often in conditions no one else would dare enter.

“His legacy lives on with a memorial Big Wave Surfing Invitational, also known as “The Eddie”, held annually at Waimea Bay—but only when the waves are over 20 feet high. We hope people enjoy this Google Doodle and take a moment to remember and celebrate Eddie, a true symbol of the ‘Aloha Spirit’.”

Winham Ure is a best-selling author and journalist, well known as proponent of the new journalism using article and fiction writing techniques in journalism. Then he started career for newswebsite content writer in New York, Winham Ure proposed an article on the southern California hot – rod culture for esquire magazine ,Ure developed his own writing style.

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