Summer Season: Google Doodle Marks summer solstice in Northern Hemisphere

Summer Season: Google Doodle Marks summer solstice in Northern Hemisphere

It’s a midsummer night’s dream on Friday for those in the northernhemisphere enjoying the longest day of the year.

Google has denoted the summer solstice with an interesting Doodle that has the exemplification of the planet Earth looking a deckchair underneath a palm tree held up on the North Pole.

The solstice, from the Latin “sol” meaning “sun” and “sistere” meaning to “stand still,” takes place on June 21, which, clouds permitting, means people can enjoy the most daylight of any day of the year.

This is on the grounds that the Earth is tilted at its most prominent point towards the Sun, which is at its highest over the Tropic of Cancer.

It denotes the visionary beginning of summer, albeit as per the meteorological calendar, summer started on June 1 and will finish on August 31.

Anyway dissimilar to different planets in the Solar System, since it is the longest day, does not imply that it is the hottest one.

The most sizzling day more often than not happens around about a month and a half after the mid year solstice, in light of the fact that the seas contain an enormous measure of warmth and are moderate to change their temperature, as indicated by Forbes.

The all-encompassing sunlight is viewed as a critical social occasion in numerous nations.

In the U.K, The Mirror reported that around 15,000 individuals assembled at the neolithic landmarks at Stonehenge in Wiltshire to watch the dawn at 4.52am BST. The yearly occasion, accepted to have been set apart for a huge number of years, has solid associations with agnosticism and symbolizes rebirth.

It is additionally critical somewhere else. During the Slavic occasion of “Ivan Kupala”, people wear floral wreaths and dance around and jump over bonfires. In Sweden, tradition dictates that for midsummer, people dance around a maypole and feast on herring and vodka, according to CNN.

In neighboring Finland, the late spring solstice, known as “Juhannus”, to pay tribute to John the Baptist, sees Finns light campfires and erect maypoles, The Independent detailed.

The general population of Fairbanks, Alaska, get up to 22.5 hours of daylight in the summer and mark the solstice with a nighttime baseball game, National Geographic reported.

Meanwhile in Spain, two days later on 23 June, midsummer is celebrated with a party, also in honor of Saint John the Baptist, as people light bonfires and gather traditional medicinal plants.

David Hammond is a news writer of News Head Line. He was formerly the supervising Anchor on the  Business show Stossel. then he got his started at News Head Line News. David investigative reporting has been featured on newsheadline.us. He is also the Author of Stories. He has a B.A. from the College of William and he lives in US.

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